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Lars Dolkemeyer

When in the who-knows-how-many infusions of one of the great comic universes the movie screens are once again hit by gigantic explosions, ultimate threats and brave superman, countless children's eyes shine brighter. Even the seriously ill girl Jo (Stycie Waweru) dreams of saving the world from evil in her home village of Maweni in Kenya. Likarion Wainaina's Supa Modo shows that no great deeds are needed - but only the belief in the superpower of the imagination.

When her mother Kathryn (Marrianne Nungo) picks her up from the hospital and brings her home, it is already clear that Jo will only have a few months to live. Out of concern for her health, her mother forbids the severely ill girl any excessive burden - but together with her sister Mwix (Nyawara Ndambia) Jo can always make secret trips to the village and show everyone what super powers she has. As the inevitable approaches, the village decides to fulfill Jo's biggest dream: to become a real heroine on the big screen, much like her great role models.

Inevitably, Supa Modo approaches the death of Stycie Waweru's deeply affecting strength. The film does not allow detours, miracles, hopes of a false salvation from the incontestable realities of life. Jo is sick and she will die and nothing can change this simple and overwhelming fact. But at the circumstances, at every single moment that remains for her, something can be changed ...

When in the who-knows-how-many infusions of one of the great comic universes the movie screens are once again hit by gigantic explosions, ultimate threats and brave superman, countless children’s eyes shine brighter. Even the seriously ill girl Jo (Stycie Waweru) dreams of saving the world from evil in her home village of Maweni in Kenya. Likarion Wainaina’s Supa Modo shows that no great deeds are needed – but only the belief in the superpower of the imagination.

When her mother Kathryn (Marrianne Nungo) picks her up from the hospital and brings her home, it is already clear that Jo will only have a few months to live. Out of concern for her health, her mother forbids the severely ill girl any excessive burden – but together with her sister Mwix (Nyawara Ndambia) Jo can always make secret trips to the village and show everyone what super powers she has. As the inevitable approaches, the village decides to fulfill Jo’s biggest dream: to become a real heroine on the big screen, much like her great role models.

Inevitably, Supa Modo approaches the death of Stycie Waweru’s deeply affecting strength. The film does not allow detours, miracles, hopes of a false salvation from the incontestable realities of life. Jo is sick and she will die and nothing can change this simple and overwhelming fact. But at the circumstances, at every single moment that remains for her, something can be changed.

So her big sister gradually convinced the whole village in ever-larger-scale actions to make Jos super capabilities real: The thieves played by neighbors in an apparent kiosk robbery will heroically beat up the little girl, the salt shaker pushes through like telekinetic energy across the table (or at least through the string that was previously attached to it?), the whole village stands still when Jo stops in the market to face a fleeing robber.

The wonderful thing about Supa Modo is the honesty of his imagination: it’s not about imagining a world in which Jo can stop time, but about a world in which community stands for one another and the dreams of a little girl actually move the world can. Finally, when all together, with the simple means available to them, undertake the endeavor, a superhero movie starring Jo in the role of her alter ego Supa Modo It reveals the true, wonderful magic of cinema: not to show what a world might look like, where super capabilities were true, but to strengthen the hope that the ordinary world, the everyday people and places would be ahead of our doors, quite literally captured by imagination and can be transformed.

This is the superpower of cinema: the inevitable transience can not be opposed, no fantasy of the world can stop or reverse death. But the cinema can capture a piece of eternity, it can create true heroes whose only super-ability is their belief in the indomitable power of imagination – a superpower that cinema can give to each one.

Supa Modo is thus a superhero film in the truest sense, which does not at any moment expire the danger of too sentimental farewell scenes. That’s why it’s a movie whose superpower is to believe in the eternity of fantasy and in its power that no death could ever harm.

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