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Sinead Anja

I received an ARC of Wake Me When I’m Gone from Netgalley. I decided to request this book mainly because of the cover. However, the blurb itself was also quite intriguing.

This book is #ownvoices for Nigerian representation.

Ese is an interesting main character. Her experiences and the people around her lead to her starting to question some of the customs in her village, which leads to her standing up for herself and trying to find a way to do something good for those who have less than she does. She’s strong in her convictions and believes in her own strength.

The writing is very simple and not at all flowery. It’s very on-point and rarely connects with other topics. There’s a very clear red line throughout the book. Most of the characters aren’t as developed as Ese is. I feel that this made the characters very one-dimensional, even though we do see an indirect mention as to how not everything is black and white later on in the book, when Duka meets Ese again. It is very clear throughout the book that the story focuses mainly on her and her development. Since Ese is the focal point of this story, most of the story is telling not showing, because she finds out about certain people and events through other people. I didn’t like this that much.

The topic of religion is introduced after a few pages. I thought that we as readers would find out more about how Ese ...

I received an ARC of Wake Me When I’m Gone from Netgalley. I decided to request this book mainly because of the cover. However, the blurb itself was also quite intriguing.

This book is #ownvoices for Nigerian representation.

Ese is an interesting main character. Her experiences and the people around her lead to her starting to question some of the customs in her village, which leads to her standing up for herself and trying to find a way to do something good for those who have less than she does. She’s strong in her convictions and believes in her own strength.

The writing is very simple and not at all flowery. It’s very on-point and rarely connects with other topics. There’s a very clear red line throughout the book. Most of the characters aren’t as developed as Ese is. I feel that this made the characters very one-dimensional, even though we do see an indirect mention as to how not everything is black and white later on in the book, when Duka meets Ese again. It is very clear throughout the book that the story focuses mainly on her and her development. Since Ese is the focal point of this story, most of the story is telling not showing, because she finds out about certain people and events through other people. I didn’t like this that much.

The topic of religion is introduced after a few pages. I thought that we as readers would find out more about how Ese feels about religion and how her belief changes, however we didn’t really find out much about her thoughts on religion. I was quite surprised about this, since it is mentioned quite regularly throughout the book, so I was expecting it to be discusses before the book ends.

Wake Me When I’m Gone is an interesting book that portrays how a woman started to realise that some of the traditions in her village were oppressive and how she finds the strength to change these rules. I wasn’t a fan of the writing style and in my opinion, some parts of the book could have been written in more detail. However, it was a nice read, and some of you are bound to enjoy this more.

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