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Dami Ajayi

Mr Panshek Zamani, better known as Ice Prince, recently released a rap album, one of many releases to welcome the yuletide season. More reason for excitement is the fact that this album, his third, called Jos to the World, is his first productive release since his contract with the Chocolate City Music Label expired and was not renewed.
Ice Prince has been on a steady rise since he clinched the popular Hennessy awards in 2009. First a member of the ECOMOG rap group and later of Loopy, a collective that also boasted of the likes of Ruby Gyang and notable rap lyricist, Mr Incredible, Ice Prince appeared on the scene almost ready for greatness.
In quick succession, he released a slew of singles among which the Brymo-assisted Oleku stood out. Becoming one of the most remixed hits in the history of Nigerian rap music, this song won accolades. But this was not solely due to Ice Prince’s lyrical delivery; Brymo summarily made that song. Ice Prince moved beyond this hit to birth other hits and released his first album, Everybody Loves Ice Prince, which became some type of contagious fire. Little wonder, he named his tepid sophomore album after fire, ergo Fire of Zamani.
Dipping in his rap delivery to occasionally flirt with the party song on his first album, by the sophomore it was indeed clear what Ice Prince’s motivations were. He was here to cash out by playing music more memorabl ... Read Full Review

Mr Panshek Zamani, better known as Ice Prince, recently released a rap album, one of many releases to welcome the yuletide season. More reason for excitement is the fact that this album, his third, called Jos to the World, is his first productive release since his contract with the Chocolate City Music Label expired and was not renewed.
Ice Prince has been on a steady rise since he clinched the popular Hennessy awards in 2009. First a member of the ECOMOG rap group and later of Loopy, a collective that also boasted of the likes of Ruby Gyang and notable rap lyricist, Mr Incredible, Ice Prince appeared on the scene almost ready for greatness.
In quick succession, he released a slew of singles among which the Brymo-assisted Oleku stood out. Becoming one of the most remixed hits in the history of Nigerian rap music, this song won accolades. But this was not solely due to Ice Prince’s lyrical delivery; Brymo summarily made that song. Ice Prince moved beyond this hit to birth other hits and released his first album, Everybody Loves Ice Prince, which became some type of contagious fire. Little wonder, he named his tepid sophomore album after fire, ergo Fire of Zamani.
Dipping in his rap delivery to occasionally flirt with the party song on his first album, by the sophomore it was indeed clear what Ice Prince’s motivations were. He was here to cash out by playing music more memorable on the dance floor. He had chosen his mission: simply to make popular music. But we all know what it means to be popular. Pop is that blip of a sound that transforms a corn to popcorn at the right temperature after all.
This reading is especially inevitable in popular music where becoming popular is one thing and staying popular is another kettle of fish.
Ice Prince gives his third LP album a suggestive title, Jos to the World; part reference to his hometown, Jos and part nod to the impending Christian celebrations. Regardless, Ice Prince appears like an unlikely Santa Claus bearing acoustic gifts. A caveat: rap music especially of the English variety appears to have begun a slow descent since the possibilities of rhyming in local tongues has put people in the attitude of looking out for local rappers.
At 19 tracks lasting 78 minutes and featuring seventeen artistes, Ice Prince worked with producers like Chopstix, Illkeyz and even Tekno to put this album together. Beginning with Me vs Me, Ice Prince announces what he is doing on a daily basis—he is blowing trees on Monday—and then, expectedly lapses into his grass to grace story which he does not seem to tire of telling.
Clearly still stuck in his raga mode, on the Yung-L featured Playlist, Ice Prince tries for a love song to one of his fans that has got him “on the playlist.” It is quite the navel-gazing song, like the entire album is.
With songs titled Excellency, Boss, Rich, Brokelyn and Trillions, a mental picture creeps in: songs predictably courting either a dancehall feel or straight rip-offs of American trap music, with Ice Prince’s ushering his lyrical bars with boasts of his abilities, physical or financial. Without breaking sweat, it would seem he has become that rapper who courts the distance between bluff and buffoonery.
On an umpteenth listen, only a few songs will have grown on the fervent listener. One word probably best describes this album: uninspired. These songs don’t cohere to form a unit of new thought. We have heard it all before—without trying to quote Sunshine Anderson—Ice Prince moves out of the hood (Jos) with big dreams and his big dreams have come true.
Sadly, his music hasn’t.

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