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Dami Ajayi

Before Mavin Records, there was Mo Hits. Mo Hits gave us, most importantly, Wande Coal whose first album is already a classic to which, unwittingly, any crooner from Don Jazzy’s stable must compete against. Reekado Banks is a competent vocalist in terms of range when compared to his contemporaries (notably Kiss Daniel of the smoky-sultry voice fame) but Spotlight hardly packs any song with a wow effect except for the Kenny Blaq skit. A few seconds short of two minutes, Kenny Blaq delivers a testimony in a charismatic Christian gathering on behalf of his ‘brother’, Sylvanus Reekado Banks Oke, and, mid-way, bursts into a medley of Reekado Bank songs styled in that modern Igbo gospel music blending highlife guitar strumming with the occasional reggae riffs.
Move, featuring Vanessa Mdee from Tanzania, is a fine duet whilst Gbagbe has that real Afrobeat feel. Love my baby is a delightful love song delivered in a mid-tempo dancehall . Na Ur Boy is that unremarkable autobiographical song that charts Reekado Banks’ struggles whilst Olaoluwa has the juju appeal and a gospel thanksgiving disposition. The love song Today is neither delightful nor memorable. The drumbeat on Dangote is reminiscent of Young John even though it is a Babyfresh production; the overall effect of the song, like its pace, is middle level. Turn on the lights tries for the motivational but falters on the grounds of delive ... Read Full Review

Before Mavin Records, there was Mo Hits. Mo Hits gave us, most importantly, Wande Coal whose first album is already a classic to which, unwittingly, any crooner from Don Jazzy’s stable must compete against. Reekado Banks is a competent vocalist in terms of range when compared to his contemporaries (notably Kiss Daniel of the smoky-sultry voice fame) but Spotlight hardly packs any song with a wow effect except for the Kenny Blaq skit. A few seconds short of two minutes, Kenny Blaq delivers a testimony in a charismatic Christian gathering on behalf of his ‘brother’, Sylvanus Reekado Banks Oke, and, mid-way, bursts into a medley of Reekado Bank songs styled in that modern Igbo gospel music blending highlife guitar strumming with the occasional reggae riffs.
Move, featuring Vanessa Mdee from Tanzania, is a fine duet whilst Gbagbe has that real Afrobeat feel. Love my baby is a delightful love song delivered in a mid-tempo dancehall . Na Ur Boy is that unremarkable autobiographical song that charts Reekado Banks’ struggles whilst Olaoluwa has the juju appeal and a gospel thanksgiving disposition. The love song Today is neither delightful nor memorable. The drumbeat on Dangote is reminiscent of Young John even though it is a Babyfresh production; the overall effect of the song, like its pace, is middle level. Turn on the lights tries for the motivational but falters on the grounds of delivery and technicality. This song might be Don Jazzy’s worst production yet and thankfully, the bonus tracks save it from being the last song on the album.
As to the spot where Reekado Banks occupies on the crooner’s canon, one must be full of excuses for what the Nigerian music album has become—predictable, excessive and retrospective. The best songs, after several listens, are his trio of earlier hits catalogued as bonus tracks. The more delightful songs are his experiments in the juju/highlife genre. The mid-tempo dance hall songs are quite catchy but are not as memorable as he intended and, in spite of his vocal range, Spotlight hardly matches the anticipated rating for Mavin’s finest male vocalist.

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