22

Dami Ajayi

Patoranking’s interest in reggae tends towards lover’s rock and, shockingly, this album is less dancehall. GOE is more reflective and meditative than one would have expected of a musician whose breakthrough came by way of dancehall. Songs like Money and Writing on the wall stand out as biographic statements reflecting on ghetto life, poverty and a glimmer of hope.
All other songs tend toward heterosexual intimacy, partying and, ultimately, love. Another gem is the Sarkodie-assisted No Kissing Baby, which updates reggae music with not just West African nuances but with Twi. Mama Aboyo, featuring Olamide Baddo, cheekily follows this and pales beside it by being at best a lousy tribute to Ajegunle raga music (blame Baddo!). Still on featured acts, Wizkid sounds like the Wizkid of Superstar era on This Kind Luv, outshining Patoranking, the celebrant.
Daniella whine featuring both Elephant Man and Konshens is evidently the dancehall song of the album, packing an effectual energy which is undoubtedly attributable to the vocalist trio as well as the producer duo, Slick Mo and UC Prof. Stammerer picks the most unlikely theme for a concept song. It doesn’t quite fail but it pales beside the modern master of that tendency in Nigerian music, Falz the bad guy. On songs like Forever, Beautiful and Killing me, the themes of love abides and, at some point, is over-flogged.
The umpteenth l ... Read Full Review

Patoranking’s interest in reggae tends towards lover’s rock and, shockingly, this album is less dancehall. GOE is more reflective and meditative than one would have expected of a musician whose breakthrough came by way of dancehall. Songs like Money and Writing on the wall stand out as biographic statements reflecting on ghetto life, poverty and a glimmer of hope.
All other songs tend toward heterosexual intimacy, partying and, ultimately, love. Another gem is the Sarkodie-assisted No Kissing Baby, which updates reggae music with not just West African nuances but with Twi. Mama Aboyo, featuring Olamide Baddo, cheekily follows this and pales beside it by being at best a lousy tribute to Ajegunle raga music (blame Baddo!). Still on featured acts, Wizkid sounds like the Wizkid of Superstar era on This Kind Luv, outshining Patoranking, the celebrant.
Daniella whine featuring both Elephant Man and Konshens is evidently the dancehall song of the album, packing an effectual energy which is undoubtedly attributable to the vocalist trio as well as the producer duo, Slick Mo and UC Prof. Stammerer picks the most unlikely theme for a concept song. It doesn’t quite fail but it pales beside the modern master of that tendency in Nigerian music, Falz the bad guy. On songs like Forever, Beautiful and Killing me, the themes of love abides and, at some point, is over-flogged.
The umpteenth listen asserts that this album’s title, God over Everything, is pretentious. Of course, the maxim abides as a cosmic truth but Patoranking’s recruitment of it as banner for his first album is suspect.
Love Town, co-written with Harrysong, is yet another gem of a cross-over lovers rock song. It is quite remarkable that Patoranking comes across as very strong on the songs he sings alone.
The final song on the album, Ayinde, features the most unlikely artiste, the Fuji legend, King Wasiu Ayinde Marshal 1, who pretty much usurped the song from Patoranking. If the plan was to attempt a fusion of fuji, lovers rock and afrobeats — it failed. The success of this song, however, is that a huge size of fuji lovers now have a reason to buy Patoranking’s album. Whilst acknowledging Patoranking as a well-behaved lad, KWAM 1 claims the ownership of music and, for me, this is the wrong place to let the curtains fall on the album.
The bonus tracks are delightsome; if you like, call it a sort of after party to the new material Patoranking offers. Inadvertently, it also plots a trajectory of Patoranking’s music and his preferred cardinal points. Patoranking’s triumph remains his ability to fuse genres of music seamlessly. When he does dancehall, he owns it. When he does afrobeats, he owns it. When the album wanders into lover’s rock reggae, he owns it. But this album should have been called anything but God over everything.

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