3

Sabelo Mkhabela

Hip hop double albums don’t always work. Kwesta’s “DaKAR II” is one of those few that do. ‘Ngud’’ featuring Cassper Nyovest is not a misleading single at all. Kwesta’s a versatile rapper, with different flows. He can drop punchlines back-to-back and can also tell a story. He also attempts to sing on some tracks of his latest album, probably the only flaw I can point out.
The rapper has a lot to say and boy does he vent. He’s just a young man from K1 trying to make sense of this thing called life, the music industry too. The opening track ’The Fire’ sets the tone, addressing among other things, the MTV Base Hottest rappers list: “This is a kid in his whip bumping Tumi thinking ‘how underrated is this?’/ This is him in his crib bumping me if he does thinking ‘how overrated is this?’” His ambidexterity does him more good than bad, as he switches between English and Zulu for effect and, I imagine, relatability. He tells hood stories of hedonism (‘Ngud’’, ‘Tjovitjo’, ‘Kokotela’) and adversity (‘Preacher’, ‘One Day’). Kwesta’s not focused on settling down as communicated on ‘Mind Fcuk’, but a few love songs (‘Ng’yaz’fela Ngawe’, ‘Shooting Star’) and a song about his daughter (‘Lala Khai’) make their way onto an album by a man who “needs brain and thought of your girl”.
Ganja Beatz, Gobi Beast, Tweezy, Ameen and ... Read Full Review

Hip hop double albums don’t always work. Kwesta’s “DaKAR II” is one of those few that do. ‘Ngud’’ featuring Cassper Nyovest is not a misleading single at all. Kwesta’s a versatile rapper, with different flows. He can drop punchlines back-to-back and can also tell a story. He also attempts to sing on some tracks of his latest album, probably the only flaw I can point out.
The rapper has a lot to say and boy does he vent. He’s just a young man from K1 trying to make sense of this thing called life, the music industry too. The opening track ’The Fire’ sets the tone, addressing among other things, the MTV Base Hottest rappers list: “This is a kid in his whip bumping Tumi thinking ‘how underrated is this?’/ This is him in his crib bumping me if he does thinking ‘how overrated is this?’” His ambidexterity does him more good than bad, as he switches between English and Zulu for effect and, I imagine, relatability. He tells hood stories of hedonism (‘Ngud’’, ‘Tjovitjo’, ‘Kokotela’) and adversity (‘Preacher’, ‘One Day’). Kwesta’s not focused on settling down as communicated on ‘Mind Fcuk’, but a few love songs (‘Ng’yaz’fela Ngawe’, ‘Shooting Star’) and a song about his daughter (‘Lala Khai’) make their way onto an album by a man who “needs brain and thought of your girl”.
Ganja Beatz, Gobi Beast, Tweezy, Ameen and a few other producers provide fitting backdrops for each and every one of Kwesta’s hostile laments, Facebook status-worthy punchlines, beer-downing anthems, rhyme fests, love songs and some social commentary. Most of the beats are dark – with heavy basslines and an array of synths, but are still accessible making for a lot of potential radio singles – the likes of ‘Shooting Star’, ‘Day Ones’, ‘Afro Trap’ could be on your radio in the near future.
A few rap features made the album – notable names like AKA, Kid X, Yanga, Cassper Nyovest, T.L.T, Okmalumkoolkat all contribute verses, with the latter’s on “Mayibabo” being the most memorable. Just as some thought Future Mfana had run out of tricks, he spits a verse that’s as much rap as it is mbhaqanga, it’s one of the greatest moments on the album. Busiswa’s feature is also another bright moment – she unapologetically spreads ratchetness on “Afro Trap” just like she did on Tumi’s “Visa”.
“DaKAR II” will easily keep Kwesta’s old fans but it will also earn him a legion of new followers, like myself. Kwesta has come a long way since his debut “Special Rekwest”, and “DaKAR II” – the sequel to his sophomore “DaKAR”, is the best body of work the man has given us. Save for the weak singing, it’s hard for me to fault it.

Share this!